Switching to left-handed Dvorak

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I’m doing an experiment. A lot of my thesis work consists of me clicking between form elements, spreadsheet cells, or parts of text documents, entering short bits of text and then clicking away to another thing.

I’ve been trying to bring my efficiency up, but running into a wall. The rate-limiting step in my workflow is not my typing speed or how quickly I find information, but rather how fast I can switch from mouse to keyboard.

A few years back, I switched from QWERTY to Dvorak, which was distressing at the time, but turned out to have been an excellent life choice. (Highly recommended!) I’m going to try left-handed Dvorak out for a bit and see how it takes. :)

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2015-4353,
    title = {Switching to left-handed Dvorak},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2015-01-14,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/14/switching-to-left-handed-dvorak/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Switching to left-handed Dvorak" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 14 Jan 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/14/switching-to-left-handed-dvorak/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2015, Jan 14). Switching to left-handed Dvorak [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/14/switching-to-left-handed-dvorak/

An unexpected link between computer science and the ethics of consent in the acutely comatose

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Yesterday, Dr Weijer from Western U came to the STREAM research group at McGill to give a talk on the ethics of fMRI studies on acutely comatose patients in the intensive care unit. One of the topics he briefly covered (not the main topic of his talk) was that of patients who may be “awake,” but generally unaware of their surroundings, while in an acutely comatose state of some kind. Using an fMRI, questions can be asked of some of these subjects, by telling them to imagine playing tennis for “yes,” and to imagine navigating their home for “no.” Since the areas of the brain for these two tasks are very different, these can be used to distinguish responses with some accuracy. In some rare cases, patients in this condition are able to consistently answer biographical questions, indicating that they are in some sense, conscious.

One of the questions that arises is: Could we use this method to involve a comatose patient in decision-making regarding her own care, in cases where we were able to establish this sort of communication?

Informed consent in medical ethics is usually conceived in terms of: disclosure, capacity and voluntariness, and the most obvious question to arise in the types of cases we’re considering is whether or not you could ever know with certainty that a comatose person has the capacity to make such decisions in such a state. (Indeed, a comatose patient is often the example given of someone who does not have the capacity to consent.) Dr Weijer was generally sceptical on that front.

Partway through his discussion, I had the impression that the problem was strangely familiar. If we abstract away some of the details of the situation in question, we are left with an experimenter who is sending natural language queries into a black box system, which replies with a digital (0/1) output, and then the experimenter has to make the best evaluation she can as to whether the black box contains a person, or if it is just an “automatic” response of some kind.

For those of you with some background in computer science, you will recognise this as the Turing Test. Over the 65 years since it was first suggested, for one reason or another, most people have abandoned the Turing Test as a way to address the question of artificial intelligence, although it still holds a certain popular sway, as claims of chatbots that can beat the Turing Test still make the news. While many would reject that it is even an important question whether a chatbot can make you believe it is a person, at least in the fMRI/coma patient version, no one can dispute whether there is something important at stake.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2015-4345,
    title = {An unexpected link between computer science and the ethics of consent in the acutely comatose},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2015-01-13,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/13/an-unexpected-link-between-computer-science-and-the-ethics-of-consent-in-the-acutely-comatose/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "An unexpected link between computer science and the ethics of consent in the acutely comatose" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 13 Jan 2015. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/13/an-unexpected-link-between-computer-science-and-the-ethics-of-consent-in-the-acutely-comatose/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2015, Jan 13). An unexpected link between computer science and the ethics of consent in the acutely comatose [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2015/01/13/an-unexpected-link-between-computer-science-and-the-ethics-of-consent-in-the-acutely-comatose/

Four causes in Aristotle and in Lojban

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Cause of parents' death? Got in my way.

Cause of parents’ death? Got in my way.

Reading through Lojban for Beginners on a Friday night (like everyone else who knows how to party—am I right?), I got to the chapter where causation and implication are discussed. In it, the authors explain that Lojban has 4 ways to say “because.”

The inventors of Lojban were not the first to preach a Doctrine of Four Causes. Aristotle also believed that when you asked Why?, you could be reasonably taken to be asking one of four different questions, which I have summed up below in Table 1. In Table 2, I summarise the four ways to say “because” in Lojban.

I made an attempt to see how well these things would match up by giving examples and rough equivalents. Unfortunately for Aristotle, they only seem to correspond decently well in two cases. But then I guess if I were trying to write a timeless philosophy, and someone told me that after ~ 2300 years, people would still be interested in half of the questions that I identified, I’d probably think that I did pretty well. Especially considering that Aristotle spoke Ancient Greek, which is pretty much the anti-Lojban if any language is.

For the other two of Aristotle’s causes, there are words in Lojban for the ideas expressed, but they aren’t really “causation” type words in the same way.

Table 1. Aristotle’s four causes

Cause Example Rough Lojban equivalent
Material cause The house is here because there were bricks, mortar and wood here previously. te zbasu (?)
Efficient cause The house is here because Bob built it. rinka
Formal cause The house is here because the materials have been arranged in a certain way. tarmi (?)
Final cause The house is here because Bob wanted to have dance-parties inside it. mukti

Table 2. Causes in Lojban

Cause “Because” word Root gismu Example Rough Aristotelean equivalent
Physically caused ri’a rinka la bab. morsi ri’a lonu mi darxi by
Bob is dead because I hit him.
Efficient cause
Motivated mu’i mukti la bab. morsi mu’i lonu mi na’e nelci by
Bob is dead because I didn’t like him.
Final cause
Justification ki’u krinu la bab. morsi ki’u lonu by djuno lo dukse
Bob is dead because he knew too much.
Logically entailed ni’i krinu la bab. morsi ni’i lonu ro lo remna mrodimna kei .e lonu by remna
Bob is dead because all humans are mortal and Bob is a human.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4299,
    title = {Four causes in Aristotle and in Lojban},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-10-24,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/24/four-causes-in-aristotle-and-in-lojban/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Four causes in Aristotle and in Lojban" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 24 Oct 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/24/four-causes-in-aristotle-and-in-lojban/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Oct 24). Four causes in Aristotle and in Lojban [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/24/four-causes-in-aristotle-and-in-lojban/

In defense of #selfies

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Someone felt good enough about her appearance that she took a picture. Let us all ridicule her for that.

Someone felt good enough about her appearance that she took a picture. Let us all ridicule her for that. HA HA.

It is fashionable these days to tease people who take selfies, or to look down one’s nose at those who do take selfies, or to dismiss them as juvenile, feminine, vain, or generally bad for reasons unspecified.

You’ve seen it before. Maybe you’ve done it yourself. You see someone pull out a phone to take a selfie, and you make a joke about it, or someone complains about how “everyone is always taking selfies.”

There’s a sort of a snobbish “I’m better than that” attitude that comes along with all these condemnations. The commentator looks around after the comment was made, grinning in a most self-satisfied way, as if he has said something most original and daring. There’s a smug, superior, aren’t-I-clever-for-going-against-the-grain vibe that I get from people who say things like that, and I just can’t handle the hypocrisy anymore.

First off, when you condemn selfies and those who take them, you are not saying anything clever or original. It’s not funny. It’s not illuminating. You haven’t picked out some interesting and unremarked-upon feature of human experience that no-one else has noticed. (Not that I’m claiming that any of the following ideas are original to myself either—plenty of other people have had reasoned pro-selfie positions. Consider this more of a rant than a claim to an original philosophy.)

Further, you are not some brave individualistic rebel among a flock of narcissistic sheeple. If anything, this makes you more like a corporate shill, helping to ensure that a new generation of young people is intimidated into believing that they have good reason to be insecure (and thus prepared to spend money to make that feeling go away). There are, after all, entire industries whose business model depends on encouraging our insecurities and preying on them. So if you’re feeling smug about being the lone wolf who’s bucking a terrifying trend of vanity, you should consider that every single person you’re criticising has been told “you’re not good enough and you should feel bad about it” in a million subtle (and also a million not-so-subtle-and-corporately-funded) ways for their entire life.

When you say things like, “No one wants to see your selfies,” you are not actually commenting on the value of the photographs that you’re disparaging, even if you think that’s what you’re doing. You’re coming closer to making a commentary on your own value as a friend, though. With a statement like that, you’re saying, “I don’t care about you, how you look, or what you’re doing. I don’t care that you felt good about yourself today.” And when you say things like that, you’re telling everyone in earshot that they shouldn’t expect positive feedback or encouragement from you.

It’s the same sort of attitude that you get from people who say things like, “Don’t tweet about what you had for breakfast,” or “You don’t need to make a Facebook post every time you go for a run.” You know what? If you care that little, no one’s forcing you to use social media. You can leave the party if you’re not enjoying it.

And this is why the whole thing is hypocrisy: When you say, “How egotistical—my friend posted a selfie,” what you are really saying is “I don’t care about my friend—if she is feeling good about her appearance, or what she’s doing, or if she just wants some positive attention from her friends, then that is unimportant or offensive to me somehow.” And that attitude—trying to make someone feel bad, just so you can have the satisfaction of looking down your nose at her—is so much more self-absorbed than posting a selfie.

As for me, I do care about my friends, and when I see a friend’s selfie go by on my Twitter feed, I want my first thought to be “Aww, isn’t that cute,” and not “How can I make that person feel bad?” That’s the kind of person I want to be.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4276,
    title = {In defense of #selfies},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-10-15,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/15/in-defense-of-selfies/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "In defense of #selfies" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 15 Oct 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/15/in-defense-of-selfies/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Oct 15). In defense of #selfies [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/10/15/in-defense-of-selfies/

Here’s some materials for learning Lojban

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Here are a few of the resources that I’ve been using to learn Lojban so far. I will very likely update and expand this list as time goes on.

Basics on Lojban

Good Lojban reference sites

Flash cards for learning Lojban

Anki (free and open source for Linux/Mac/Windows/Android/iOS)

  • Has a set of Lojban cards
  • Syncs between devices

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4264,
    title = {Here’s some materials for learning Lojban},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-09-24,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/24/heres-some-materials-for-learning-lojban/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Here’s some materials for learning Lojban" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 24 Sep 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/24/heres-some-materials-for-learning-lojban/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Sep 24). Here’s some materials for learning Lojban [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/24/heres-some-materials-for-learning-lojban/

So I started learning Lojban .ui

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This Friday past, I started learning Lojban. For the non-initiate, Lojban is a constructed language based on predicate logic that is syntactically unambiguous. I’d known about it for years, probably hearing about it first on CBC, maybe 10 years ago. It’s the sort of thing that shows up in Dinosaur Comics or in XKCD periodically. Up until this weekend, the existence of Lojban had mostly been one of those “cocktail party facts,” but then I finally took the plunge. After 1 weekend of working on it, I’m about 35% of the way through Lojban for Beginners, having downloaded it to my Kobo for reference during the car ride to Stratford.

It’s often billed as being an ideal language for fields like law, science or philosophy, due to its unambiguous and culturally neutral nature. So I set out to find out certain specialised terms from my field, bioethics, and it turns out that they mostly don’t exist yet. This, of course, offers some exciting opportunities for a grad student. :)

I’ve convinced a few people in Montréal to learn Lojban with me, and even found a Montrealer who speaks Lojban on a #lojban IRC channel. (Yes, IRC still exists!) We may “ckafi pinxe kansa,” as they say in Lojban, apparently.

If you too want to get in on the ground floor of Lojban Montréal, let me know!

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4260,
    title = {So I started learning Lojban .ui},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-09-22,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/22/so-i-started-learning-lojban-ui/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "So I started learning Lojban .ui" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 22 Sep 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/22/so-i-started-learning-lojban-ui/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Sep 22). So I started learning Lojban .ui [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/22/so-i-started-learning-lojban-ui/

Dr Susan’s counselling service for para-magical, epi-paranormal and time-travel adjacent children and young adults

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Dr Susan's Counselling Service

Dr Susan’s Counselling Service

For this year’s upcoming NaNoWriMo, I think I have settled on an idea and a title.

A recurring trope in sci-fi and fantasy is the minor character who significantly helps the main character to accomplish a fantastical and difficult-to-believe goal (e.g. returning to her own non-dystopian timeline, saving a magical kingdom, etc.), and does so often at great cost to herself, without any hope of participating in that victory, and with little or no proof that anything of importance happened at all. I want to write a series of short stories about this sort of character, and a therapist whose job it is to help them pick up the pieces of their shattered lives, after they discover that they’re living in a dystopian timeline bad enough that a time-traveller needed their help to go back in time to prevent it, leaving them hopelessly behind.

The title will be Dr Susan’s counselling service for para-magical, epi-paranormal and time-travel adjacent children and young adults.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4251,
    title = {Dr Susan’s counselling service for para-magical, epi-paranormal and time-travel adjacent children and young adults},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-09-14,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/14/dr-susans-counselling-service-for-para-magical-epi-paranormal-and-time-travel-adjacent-children-and-young-adults/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Dr Susan’s counselling service for para-magical, epi-paranormal and time-travel adjacent children and young adults" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 14 Sep 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/14/dr-susans-counselling-service-for-para-magical-epi-paranormal-and-time-travel-adjacent-children-and-young-adults/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Sep 14). Dr Susan’s counselling service for para-magical, epi-paranormal and time-travel adjacent children and young adults [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/09/14/dr-susans-counselling-service-for-para-magical-epi-paranormal-and-time-travel-adjacent-children-and-young-adults/

Proof of prespecified endpoints in medical research with the bitcoin blockchain

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Introduction

The gerrymandering of endpoints or analytic strategies in medical research is a serious ethical issue. “Fishing expeditions” for statistically significant relationships among trial data or meta-analytic samples can confound proper inference by statistical multiplicity. This may undermine the validity of research findings, and even threaten a favourable balance of patient risk and benefit in certain clinical trials. “Changing the goalposts” for a clinical trial or a meta-analysis when a desired endpoint is not reached is another troubling example of a potential scientific fraud that is possible when endpoints are not specified in advance.

Pre-specifying endpoints

Choosing endpoints to be measured and analyses to be performed in advance of conducting a study is a hallmark of good research practice. However, if a protocol is published on an author’s own web site, it is trivial for an author to retroactively alter her own “pre-specified” goals to align with the objectives pursued in the final publication. Even a researcher who is acting in good faith may find it less than compelling to tell her readers that endpoints were pre-specified, with only her word as a guarantee.

Advising a researcher to publish her protocol in an independent venue such as a journal or a clinical trial registry in advance of conducting research does not solve this problem, and even creates some new ones. Publishing a methods paper is a lengthy and costly process with no guarantee of success—it may not be possible to find a journal interested in publishing your protocol.

Pre-specifying endpoints in a clinical trial registry may be feasible for clinical trials, but these registries are not open to meta-analytic projects. Further, clinical trial registry entries may be changed, and it is much more difficult (although still possible) to download previous versions of trial registries than it is to retrieve the current one. For example, there is still no way to automate downloading of XML-formatted historical trial data from www.clinicaltrials.gov in the same way that the current version of trial data can be automatically downloaded and processed. Burying clinical trial data in the “history” of a registry is not a difficult task.

Publishing analyses to be performed prior to executing the research itself potentially sets up a researcher to have her project “scooped” by a faster or better-funded rival research group who finds her question interesting.

Using the bitcoin blockchain to prove a document’s existence at a certain time

Bitcoin uses a distributed, permanent, timestamped, public ledger of all transactions (called a “blockchain”) to establish which addresses have been credited with how many bitcoins. The blockchain indirectly provides a method for establishing the existence of a document at particular time that can be independently verified by any interested party, without relying on a medical researcher’s moral character or the authority (or longevity) of a central registry. Even in the case that the NIH’s servers were destroyed by a natural disaster, if there were any full bitcoin nodes left running in the world, the method described below could be used to confirm that a paper’s analytic method was established at the time the authors claim.

Method

  1. Prepare a document containing the protocol, including explicitly pre-specified endpoints and all prospectively planned analyses. I recommend using a non-proprietary document format (e.g. an unformatted text file or a LaTeX source file).
  2. Calculate the document’s SHA256 digest and convert it to a bitcoin private key.
  3. Import this private key into a bitcoin wallet, and send an arbitrary amount of bitcoin to its corresponding public address. After the transaction is complete, I recommend emptying the bitcoin from that address to another address that only you control, as anyone given the document prepared in (1) will have the ability to generate the private key and spend the funds you just sent to it.

Result

The incorporation into the blockchain of the first transaction using the address generated from the SHA256 digest of the document provides an undeniably timestamped record that the research protocol prepared in (1) is at least as old as the transaction in question. Care must be taken not to accidentally modify the protocol after this point, since only an exact copy of the original protocol will generate an identical SHA256 digest. Even the alteration of a single character will make the document fail an authentication test.

To prove a document’s existence at a certain point in time, a researcher need only provide the document in question. Any computer would be able to calculate its SHA256 digest and convert to a private key with its corresponding public address. Anyone can search for transactions on the blockchain that involve this address, and check the date when the transaction happened, proving that the document must have existed at least as early as that date.

Discussion

This strategy would prevent a researcher from retroactively changing an endpoint or adding / excluding analyses after seeing the results of her study. It is simple, economical, trustless, non-proprietary, independently verifiable, and provides no opportunity for other researchers to steal the methods or goals of a project before its completion.

Unfortunately, this method would not prevent a malicious team of researchers from preparing multiple such documents in advance, in anticipation of a need to defraud the medical research establishment. To be clear, under a system as described above, retroactively changing endpoints would no longer be a question of simply deleting a paragraph in a Word document or in a trial registry. This level of dishonesty would require planning in advance (in some cases months or years), detailed anticipation of multiple contingencies, and in many cases, the cooperation of multiple members of a research team. At that point, it would probably be easier to just fake the numbers than it would be to have a folder full of blockchain-timestamped protocols with different endpoints, ready in case the endpoints need to be changed.

Further, keeping a folder of blockchain-timestamped protocols would be a very risky pursuit—all it would take is a single honest researcher in the lab to find those protocols, and she would have a permanent, undeniable and independently verifiable proof of the scientific fraud.

Conclusion

Fraud in scientific methods erodes confidence in the medical research establishment, which is essential to it performing its function—generating new scientific knowledge, and cases where pre-specified endpoints are retroactively changed casts doubt on the rest of medical research. A method by which anyone can verify the existence of a particular detailed protocol prior to research would lend support to the credibility of medical research, and be one less thing about which researchers have to say, “trust me.”

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4232,
    title = {Proof of prespecified endpoints in medical research with the bitcoin blockchain},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-08-25,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/25/proof-of-prespecified-endpoints-in-medical-research-with-the-bitcoin-blockchain/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Proof of prespecified endpoints in medical research with the bitcoin blockchain" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 25 Aug 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/25/proof-of-prespecified-endpoints-in-medical-research-with-the-bitcoin-blockchain/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Aug 25). Proof of prespecified endpoints in medical research with the bitcoin blockchain [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/25/proof-of-prespecified-endpoints-in-medical-research-with-the-bitcoin-blockchain/

How to roll your own simple BitID Mac desktop app with UI

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Prep

  • Make sure you have Python 2.7 installed
  • Download SimpleBitID
  • You’ll need to comment out “import _winreg as wreg” in SimpleBitID.py to make it work on a Mac
  • I commented out “print rawuri” and put “print rep.reason, rep.status” for line 39 in bitidpy.py. (This is just for style points.)
  • Make a small encrypted disc image using the Disk Utility. I called mine “Personal” (as opposed to my “Work” drive), so that the system mounts the disc image as /Volumes/Personal/
  • Move the SimpleBitID-0.05 directory onto this disk image. I put mine in a directory called BitID.

In Automator

BitID Automator Workflow

BitID Automator Workflow

Make an Automator workflow that looks like the screenshot to the left of this paragraph.

Save your Automator workflow as an application. You can put it on your desktop or anywhere that you want to keep it.

How to use

When you find a site that uses BitID authentication, (here’s an example), right-click on the bitid: link and click “copy link.”

Run your new Automator application. It will prompt you for the bitid: link. (Illustrated below)

Paste the link into the prompt.

If everything works like it does on my computer, you’ll see a “success” notification pop up:

Let me know if this works for you—or if it doesn’t. :P

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4216,
    title = {How to roll your own simple BitID Mac desktop app with UI},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-08-12,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/12/how-to-roll-your-own-simple-bitid-mac-desktop-app-with-ui/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "How to roll your own simple BitID Mac desktop app with UI" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 12 Aug 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/12/how-to-roll-your-own-simple-bitid-mac-desktop-app-with-ui/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Aug 12). How to roll your own simple BitID Mac desktop app with UI [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/08/12/how-to-roll-your-own-simple-bitid-mac-desktop-app-with-ui/

Le trottoir, c’est pour les piétons

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Ne faites pas du vélo sur le trottoir. Il ne faut jamais faire ça. Si vous ne vous sentez pas en sécurité dans la rue, descendez de votre vélo et marchez à côté.

(English version follows)

Pourquoi ne devrais-je pas faire du vélo sur le trottoir?

  • C’est contre la loi
  • C’est dangereux pour les piétons
    • Vraiment dangereux
    • Vous pouvez tuer quelqu’un
    • Vous pouvez handicaper une personne
    • Vous n’avez pas le droit de decider du niveau de danger auquel vous soumettez les piétons

Mais, les autos ne suivent pas les lois parfaitement eux non plus

Vous avez quoi? Comme six ans? Si quelqu’un d’autre enfreint les règles ça ne vous donne pas le droit de le faire aussi. La loi s’applique aux vélos. Non, vous n’êtes spécial ni un cas particulier.

Mais, parfois, faire du vélo sur le chemin, c’est dangereux pour moi!

  • Modifie ta route pour prendre la piste cyclable, autant que possible
  • Vous pouvez toujours descendre de votre vélo et marchez à côté, si vous devez prendre cette route en particulier, et si emprunter la rue est trop dangereux

Si vous faites du vélo sur le trottoir au lieu de marcher à côté de votre vélo, et vous vous dites, “je fais ça à cause du danger dans la rue,” vous ne vous dites pas “ma sécurité est aussi important que n’importe qui d’autre.” Vous dites, “ma personne et mon plaisir est plus important que la sécurité d’un piéton.” Et ça fait de vous un douchewad.

Vous ne pouvez pas vous attendre à ce que je marche à côté de mon vélo!

Oui. Je peux. Même si ça prend un 30 secondes de plus pour aller sur la piste cyclable. Vous allez survivre.

Mais je porte mes chaussures à vélo et je ne peux pas marcher avec!

Si votre choix de chaussure fait qu’il vous est impossible de respect la loi et emprunter les rues de la ville de manière sécuritaire mais pas juste pour vous, pour les autres aussi—piétons incluent—donc, vous devez choisir plus attentivement lorsque vous aller jouer avec vos jouets de vélo spécial.

Oui, je l’ai dit—vos chaussures à vélo ne sont rien d’autre que des jouets de vélo spécial, et le plaisir que vous avez avec ces jouets à vélo spécial n’est pas plus important que le sécurité de quelqu’un d’autre.

Si je ne peux pas porter mes chaussures à vélo quand je vais au travail, quand est-ce que je vais les porter?

Je ne sais tellement pas! Peut-être au Tour de France!

Je sais que vous prenez ça sérieusement, mais, les chaussures à vélos sont des équipement sportifs spécialisés et leur place est dans une course de vélo (où la police a bloqué la rue), ou sur les pistes cyclable, ou n’importe où, si le plaisir que vous tirez de cet équipements sportif spécialisé n’interfère pas avec la sécurité des autres.

Pour résumer

Ne pas faire de vélo sur le trottoir.

Descendez de votre vélo et marchez à côté.


Don’t ride your bike on the sidewalk. Ever. If you don’t feel safe on the road, get off your bike, and walk with it.

Why shouldn’t I ride my bike on the sidewalk?

  • It’s against the law
  • It’s dangerous for pedestrians
    • Actually dangerous
    • Life-in-danger dangerous
    • Permanent-disability dangerous
    • It shouldn’t even matter how dangerous it is, you shouldn’t get to choose what level of risk I have to bear as a pedestrian

But cars don’t follow traffic laws perfectly either!

What are you, six years old? You don’t get to break the rules just because someone else did. The law applies to cyclists. You are not a special case.

But in some places, it’s dangerous for me to ride on the road!

  • Modify your route to take the bike path, where possible
  • You can always get off your bike and walk if you need to take that particular path and it’s too dangerous to be on the road

If you ride your bike on the sidewalk rather than walking with your bike on the sidewalk, and you say that you’re doing it because it’s dangerous for you on the road, you are not saying “my safety is as important as anyone else’s.” What you are saying is “my convenience is more important than a pedestrian’s safety,” which makes you a douchewad.

You can’t expect me to walk my bike!

Yes I can. Even if it takes you an extra 30 seconds to get to the bike path every morning. You will survive.

But I’m wearing bike shoes that I can’t walk on!

If your choice in footwear makes it impossible for you to obey the law and conduct yourself through the city in a manner that is safe not just for yourself but also for those around you—including pedestrians—then you need to choose more carefully when it is that you play with your fancy bike toys.

Yes, I said it—your bike shoes are fancy bike toys, and your enjoyment of those fancy bike toys is not more important than another person’s safety.

If I can’t wear my bike-shoes when commuting, when can I wear them?

I don’t know! Maybe when you’re on the Tour de France!

I know you take this bike stuff very seriously, but fancy bike shoes that attach to fancy bike pedals are specialty athletic equipment, and their place is in a serious bike race (one where the police have blocked off the streets), or on a bike path, or basically anywhere that your enjoyment of that specialised athletic equipment doesn’t interfere with other people’s safety.

To sum up

Bicycles should not be on the sidewalk.

Get off your bike and walk with it.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2014-4202,
    title = {Le trottoir, c’est pour les piétons},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2014-07-18,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/07/18/le-trottoir-cest-pour-les-pietons/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Le trottoir, c’est pour les piétons" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 18 Jul 2014. Web. 21 Feb 2019. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/07/18/le-trottoir-cest-pour-les-pietons/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2014, Jul 18). Le trottoir, c’est pour les piétons [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2014/07/18/le-trottoir-cest-pour-les-pietons/

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