Gingerbread Tardis

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Tardis

"Hello, I'm the Doctor."

In light of some difficult family circumstances, I decided to take a night and do something silly. I had a friend over, one with whom I am in the habit of watching Doctor Who. While the result wasn’t quite as good as some other gingerbread Tardises on the internet, I am very happy to present photographs from last night’s project.

Usually, when I make something creative with gingerbread, I use a lot of red food colouring. You know, for the blood.

This time, however, the carnage was only an afterthought. I didn’t mean for there to be such a high death toll. Honest! And further, I think that the massacre was relatively tasteful for me.

The only cookie cutters I own

The only cookie cutters I own

The real reason why there was so many dead people is not because of the (very adorable) gingerbread Daleks. It’s mostly because I only own cookie cutters that have pieces missing from them. (Thanks for the present, Steph!)

You’ll note that even the gingerbread man who I assume is supposed to be the Doctor (the one who is halfway inside the Tardis) is missing his hand. My interpretation of this is that this is a scene from the few seconds during which the Doctor had his hand cut off by the Sycorax before it regenerated. This makes sense, because that happened during the “Christmas Invasion Special,” and it’s a gingerbread Tardis, so it should be on a Christmas theme, after all.

Tardis and bodies

"Exterminate!"

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2010-1049,
    title = {Gingerbread Tardis},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2010-12-18,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/12/18/gingerbread-tardis/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Gingerbread Tardis" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 18 Dec 2010. Web. 10 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/12/18/gingerbread-tardis/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2010, Dec 18). Gingerbread Tardis [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/12/18/gingerbread-tardis/

The Quidditch World Cup 2010

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The team gathering around our coach

The team gathering around our coach

This weekend past, as you may recall from seeing on various news stations, was the 2010 Quidditch World Cup in New York City. I was on the McGill team that competed, and I had a fantastic time. We played well, won more games than we lost, and beat the team from Harvard University. :)

For me, the highlight from the World Cup was watching the brilliant performances of the Golden Snitches. These were some amazing athletes. I can think of no other sport where there is a position that combines long distance running, wrestling and acrobatic showmanship.

I'm number 25

I'm number 25

There are few rules for the conduct of a snitch in a game. This means that the snitch can pull a seeker off his broom, interfere with players from another game, or wrestle a seeker to the ground, in an attempt to prevent the seekers from catching him or her.

People attending the Cup who were unfamiliar with the snitch were especially fun to listen to. I overheard a person behind me, at the beginning of a game ask her friend in a very confused voice, “Wait. He just ran off the field. Is he supposed to do that?”

This is why we won the spirit award

This is why we won the spirit award

Or later in the day, I heard someone else declare, “I don’t know. I just think something’s not right when you see a snitch hailing a cab.”

I have compiled a short list of some of the most entertaining things that I personally watched a snitch do in the course of a game.

  • Climb up a fence
  • Climb on top of a nearby building
  • Run onto the field of another game and interfere with the gameplay by bludgeoning one of the seekers
  • Return to the field riding a unicycle that he got somehow
  • Taunt one team’s seeker by pulling off his cape and holding it in front of him in the manner of a Spanish bull-fighter
  • Pick up the quaffle and offer it to a spectator on one knee, as if it were a token of his affection
  • Pull off two team members headbands and exchange them (coloured headbands are used to designate positions)
  • Pull a hoop off its stand and pass himself through it three times, before declaring to the crowd, “I have thirty points now!”
Playing against Carleton

Playing against Carleton

But my favourite moment was in the final game between Middlebury and the Tufflepuffs (the team from Tufts). For starters, the snitch for that game was brilliant. He could run faster backward than the seekers could run forward. He could flip a seeker on his back without losing his own momentum. It was amazing to watch.

Toward the end, the snitch returned to the field, and with him came all the other snitches who had snitched the other games for the Cup. They arranged themselves around the real snitch, like a Roman Phalanx, so the seekers couldn’t catch him, and after a few seconds, they all ran around the field in a big blur of yellow, so it was impossible to tell from the sides where the real snitch was, and I’m sure it was equally confusing for the seekers, who were just returning to the field from chasing the snitch. Eventually, the false snitches left the field, and the snitch was caught by the Tufts team, but the playfulness and the athleticism of the snitches were really remarkable.

I think that I want to work on my distance running this year and maybe next year I’ll be good enough to be a Golden Snitch at the World Cup. :)

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2010-998,
    title = {The Quidditch World Cup 2010},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2010-11-17,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/11/17/the-quidditch-world-cup-2010/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "The Quidditch World Cup 2010" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 17 Nov 2010. Web. 10 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/11/17/the-quidditch-world-cup-2010/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2010, Nov 17). The Quidditch World Cup 2010 [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/11/17/the-quidditch-world-cup-2010/

Memories of French class

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Téléfrançais - Bonjour, allô, salut!

Téléfrançais – Bonjour, allô, salut!

Does anyone else remember Téléfrançais? It was a children’s programme meant for French-language instruction made in the 1980’s by TVOntario, starring the crime against nature that you see in the picture attached to this post.

I take it as a sign that my French is still at an immature level, that sometimes, after conducting a conversation entirely in French, I walk away feeling very satisfied with myself and humming the Téléfrançais theme song.

The very last Téléfrançais émission that I remember seeing in elementary school ended with a puppet flying an airplane for some reason, and Ananas (the pineapple puppet) and the children were passengers. Les Squelettes were on the wings of the aircraft too, as I recall. At the last moment, the puppet lost control of the airplane and they were about to crash, when the closing credits started to roll over the screen. I never saw the next émission, so as far as I know, that’s how the television programme ended—with the death of all the characters in a fiery airplane disaster. Actually, that wouldn’t be so hard to believe.

There’s an obvious life-lesson to be learned here: Don’t fly in an aircraft where the pilot is a puppet.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2010-898,
    title = {Memories of French class},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2010-08-25,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/25/memories-of-french-class/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Memories of French class" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 25 Aug 2010. Web. 10 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/25/memories-of-french-class/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2010, Aug 25). Memories of French class [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/25/memories-of-french-class/

I just remembered

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District 9

District 9

I just remembered why it is that I posted my review of District 9 under bioethics.

[There is a medium-grade spoiler in this post, so if you want to know nothing about the film before you see it, stop reading.]

I realised while watching the movie that my bioethical training has been having an effect on me. There is a scene toward the beginning of the film, where the main character is about to be cut up and his organs harvested for scientific experiments, against his will, while he is still conscious. When I saw that, I was struck with the horror of the idea of that happening to someone, but in my mind, all my objections were couched in the language of academic bioethics:

“He has not given informed consent for this research!”

“They are breaking the Dead Donor Rule!”

“That action is contrary to all four of Beauchamp and Childress’s principles of medical ethics!”

If you can name all four of Beauchamp and Childress’s principles, then you get 8 points. Two for each one.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2009-468,
    title = {I just remembered},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2009-11-25,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/25/i-just-remembered/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "I just remembered" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 25 Nov 2009. Web. 10 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/25/i-just-remembered/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2009, Nov 25). I just remembered [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/25/i-just-remembered/

It was much better than I thought it would be

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District 9 Poster

District 9 Poster

District 9 was a very good movie. I was surprised. I didn’t think that I would like it, but Pickles and I went to see it and it was certainly worth our time.

There is certainly violence in this movie, but the violence wasn’t gratuitous—it always serves the storyline.

The story itself is engaging and I found the characters convincing. The story also serves to make a commentary on human nature, generally.

This is very grown-up sci-fi, in that the aliens are not there just because it’s cool to put funny make-up on people. (To be honest, I think they were computer-generated anyway.) The way that they look is an essential part of the telling of the story. One immediately has a gut reaction against the “prawns,” due to their physical appearance. The way that one comes around to see things from the perspective of the aliens by the end of the film is a very clever bit of storytelling, and it’s worth the time to watch it.

I liked the way that it ended, with a bit of mystery. As much as I liked this film, I don’t think I would want to see it again, though. It was really quite graphic.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2009-463,
    title = {It was much better than I thought it would be},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2009-11-20,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/20/it-was-much-better-than-i-thought-it-would-be/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "It was much better than I thought it would be" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 20 Nov 2009. Web. 10 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/20/it-was-much-better-than-i-thought-it-would-be/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2009, Nov 20). It was much better than I thought it would be [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/20/it-was-much-better-than-i-thought-it-would-be/

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