Good decisions and bad decisions

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A decision is a good one or a bad one ex ante, regardless of what can be said about the results of the decision ex post. By ex ante, I mean, “as evaluated prospectively.” By ex post, I mean, “as evaluated retrospectively.”

I will give some examples to clarify what I mean.

Disaster

Troi in "Disaster"

Troi in "Disaster"

You are Deanna Troi (yes, from Star Trek: The Next Generation—don’t pretend you don’t remember this episode!) and the Enterprise suffers a terrible accident. It is about to explode. For some reason, you’re actually in command of the ship, despite the fact that you don’t wear a proper uniform. Against the advice of Ensign Ro, you decide to stick around to wait and see if someone downstairs fixes the ship before it explodes, even though you have the opportunity to escape. You have no reason to believe that anyone else is alive, but if you leave, there will be no power for anyone to fix the ship and save themselves. Fortunately for everyone, Riker and Data’s head go to engineering and save the day just in time.

Superbowl bet

You are a fan of American football, and on the night of the Superbowl, you make a bet with your friend on who will win the big game. You bet $100 on the underdog, knowing full well that they stand little chance of winning. Fortunately for you, the quarterback for the favoured team falls ill and throws up over the rest of the team. As a result, the entire team spends the next several hours projectile vomiting, and they have to forfeit the game. Your friend admits defeat and pays up the $100.

Drunk driver

You are drinking heavily, and you get into your car and drive yourself home, despite your friends’ protests and attempts to stop you. Fortunately for everyone, the streets are empty of both people and other cars, and you manage to bring yourself and your car home completely safe.

In all of these cases, ex post, you made the right decision—by that, I mean, there was an optimal result, if you consider the decision from the perspective of hindsight. Ex ante, however, in all of these cases, you made the wrong decision.

I put these examples in the order that I did because I think that readers will be most sympathetic to the decision in the first example, and least sympathetic to the decision in the last example.

In Disaster, an unreflecting analysis would say that of course Troi made the right decision—it’s the Enterprise, for Pete’s sake! They have to be all right. In Superbowl bet, you might even imagine your friend begrudgingly admitting after the fact that you made the right call (although he might say that it was “just luck,” and for some of us, our intuitions might differ). In Drunk driver, you would be hard-pressed to find anyone who would say that you made the right decision.

Decision trees

Decision trees

All of these cases have the same form, which I have diagrammed to the left. You can make one of two decisions—choice A or choice B. If you make choice A, you are likely to experience a very bad result, but there is a small chance that you will experience a good result. If you make choice B, you are certain to experience a mediocre result (one that has more utility than the very bad result, but less utility than the good result).

If all of these scenarios have the same form, we should give the same answer to the question as to what should be done in each situation, on pain of acting irrationally.

So even though you won $100 in Superbowl bet, you made the wrong decision. You should have declined to bet. Similarly, even though Troi saved the Enterprise in Disaster, she should have condemned Riker and Data’s head to death.

Why is this important?

Humans are really bad at judging probabilities and systematically make certain sorts of errors. In particular, humans are easily swayed by trying to place experiences into the context of a narrative.

For example, after being told a story about a young woman who participates in feminism rallies and studies math in college, there is a non-zero percentage of people who will say that it is more likely that she will end up as a feminist banker than as a banker, which is logically impossible. (This is the “conjunction fallacy”—all feminist bankers are bankers, after all.)

You may have won bets that were long shots in the past, out of sheer luck. In fact, if you are a betting man, likely those are the bets you remember, to the exclusion of the ones with the same odds that you lost. The point is that you shouldn’t model your future decisions after such mistakes.

Also, if someone is trying to sway your decisions through an anecdote regarding his or her own success in an endeavour that is unlikely to succeed, it is also irrational to take that as evidence on which to base your decision-making process. If the story includes the line, “and against all odds, everything turned out all right,” or something like it, you should interpret that as meaning, “I made the wrong decision, but I was lucky this time,” and treat it as a cautionary tale.

The moral of the story is that you should model your thinking after Ensign Ro, and not after Troi.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2011-2282,
    title = {Good decisions and bad decisions},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2011-10-20,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2011/10/20/good-decisions-and-bad-decisions/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Good decisions and bad decisions" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 20 Oct 2011. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2011/10/20/good-decisions-and-bad-decisions/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2011, Oct 20). Good decisions and bad decisions [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2011/10/20/good-decisions-and-bad-decisions/

A taxonomy of sarcasm

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An old friend of mine once explained this to me, and now I will pass this precious wisdom to the rest of the world. Here is how to identify what degree of sarcasm you are using or experiencing:

  1. First degree sarcasm: Saying what you don’t mean, and saying it insincerely.
    E.g. “Oh! Now that was intelligent!” [said sardonically after something stupid is done]
  2. Second degree sarcasm: Saying what you don’t mean, but saying it sincerely.
    E.g. “Oh, now that was intelligent.”  [said in a complimentary way after something stupid is done]
  3. Third degree sarcasm: Saying what you mean, but saying it insincerely.
    E.g. “Yeah, you’re a good friend.” [said in a mocking tone of voice to a true friend]
  4. Fourth degree sarcasm: Saying what you mean, and saying it sincerely.*
    E.g. “Yeah, you’re a good friend.” [said in a matter-of-fact tone of voice to a true friend]

Or in tabled form:

  Say it insincerely Say it sincerely
Say what you don’t mean 1st degree sarcasm 2nd degree sarcasm
Say what you do mean 3rd degree sarcasm 4th degree sarcasm

The first degree of sarcasm is the least subtle. It is the easiest to use in conversation and the hardest to misunderstand. It is also not very funny.

Metasarcasm can occur when someone realises that first degree sarcasm is undesirable, but makes a statement that is, on the surface, first degree sarcastic—saying what one doesn’t mean, and saying it like one doesn’t mean it. This is done in full knowledge of the comedic limitations of this degree of sarcasm, and as a mockery of first degree of sarcasm itself.

The second degree of sarcasm is slightly more subtle, and depending on timing and other contextual factors, it can be very witty or very harsh. The power in this degree of sarcasm depends on the contrast between the sincerity of the statement, while actually conveying the opposite meaning.

Third degree sarcasm can be used when first or second degree sarcasm are too coarse or obvious. Imagine that your friend is obviously working very quickly at some task. You could use first degree sarcasm to say, “Wow, you’re working really slow.” That would not be very funny at all, unless it is an example of metasarcasm, so instead you might try saying in a matter-of-fact tone, “Could you pick up the pace a bit?” which would be better—a good example of second degree sarcasm—but that might seem obvious. Another option is the use of third degree sarcasm. You might say while rolling your eyes, “Yeah, that’s impressive.” You actually are impressed by your friend’s industriousness, but you say so in a way that seems to convey the opposite meaning.

The third degree of sarcasm is also sometimes used to express vulnerable truths in a way that protects the speaker. The speaker is protected by the ambiguity of the statement. Coated with a thin layer of sarcasm, the speaker can, in subsequent sentences, make the third degree sarcastic statement appear to be either an attempt at humour or alternately, a heartfelt expression of feeling, depending on how the speaker feels it has been taken.

The fourth degree of sarcasm is the most subtle, and many deny that it is sarcasm at all. Indeed, by its definition, “a sincere expression of what one really means,” it is not hard to see why it is often missed. I leave, as an exercise for the reader, the task of coming up with some examples.

[ * I have put an asterisk after this definition because this definition gives the necessary, but not the sufficient conditions for a statement to be fourth degree sarcastic. That is, not all members of the set of statements that are sincere expressions of ideas that one means to convey are also members of the set of fourth degree sarcastic statements.]

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2010-895,
    title = {A taxonomy of sarcasm},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2010-08-29,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/29/taxonomy-of-sarcasm/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "A taxonomy of sarcasm" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 29 Aug 2010. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/29/taxonomy-of-sarcasm/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2010, Aug 29). A taxonomy of sarcasm [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/29/taxonomy-of-sarcasm/

Which is worse?

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Velociraptor on a bicycle

Velociraptor on a bicycle

Which is worse? A velociraptor on a bicycle or a bear with an automobile?

And yes, there is a correct answer.

I asked Pickles, and she says, “They are both unimaginable evils.”

Four points to whoever makes the most persuasive argument. If you can also give a feasible plan for escaping a bicyclic velociraptor or automotive bear, you will also have the satisfaction of probably having saved us all.

"Who's been driving in my car?"

"Who's been driving in my car?"

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2010-844,
    title = {Which is worse?},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2010-08-7,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/07/which-is-worse/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Which is worse?" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 07 Aug 2010. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/07/which-is-worse/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2010, Aug 07). Which is worse? [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2010/08/07/which-is-worse/

Tip for surviving a series of major life crises #3

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Take public transportation.

If you’re feeling down, you just might run into a group of people whose infectious happiness is just what you need to beat your feeling of melancholy. And if the people you run into are more depressed, unhappy, angry and ugly than you, you can think about how lucky you are not to be one of them.

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2009-537,
    title = {Tip for surviving a series of major life crises #3},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2009-12-19,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/12/19/tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises-3/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Tip for surviving a series of major life crises #3" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 19 Dec 2009. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/12/19/tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises-3/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2009, Dec 19). Tip for surviving a series of major life crises #3 [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/12/19/tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises-3/

Another tip for surviving a series of major life crises

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Small victory

Small victory

Celebrate the small victories. Sometimes, those are the only victories you can get.

The last few times I went grocery shopping, I went to the Metro supermarket across the street. It’s expensive, and the selection isn’t that great, but it’s very convenient, and now that I don’t have a car, I can’t really get all the way across town with groceries. At the Metro supermarket, I looked a couple times, and looked fairly extensively for a jar of diced garlic in oil. I like having it already chopped and in oil – it doesn’t go bad as fast, and it’s so nice when making hommus or anything, really, not to have to chop up the garlic myself.

They don’t carry it at the Metro across the street from me.

But then, when I went to the fruiterie just at the bottom of my building, I discovered that in the back, they had just exactly what I was looking for, and it was pretty cheap, too. :)

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2009-479,
    title = {Another tip for surviving a series of major life crises},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2009-11-30,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/30/another-tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Another tip for surviving a series of major life crises" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 30 Nov 2009. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/30/another-tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2009, Nov 30). Another tip for surviving a series of major life crises [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/30/another-tip-for-surviving-a-series-of-major-life-crises/

Tip for surviving major life crises

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Here is a helpful hint on how to survive a series of life crises: Turn your classmates from enemies, into friends!

By nature, your classmates are your mortal enemies. As my grade 12 geometry teacher once told me with a straight face, “It is in your best interest for your peers to do poorly.” Your relationship with your classmates is like an academic version of Hobbes’ State of Nature—a war of all against all, which of course, explains why so many academics are nasty brutish and short. It’s a bad joke, I know, but who can resist making a “nasty brutish and short” joke when discussing Hobbes? Every course of study is a zero-sum game, and every mark your classmate gets is one that you didn’t get. Remember that, next time you see a classmate.

However, contrary to these commonly-held intuitions, it is possible to make friends with your classmates. And I think I have done it. :)

BibTeX

@online{bgcarlisle2009-477,
    title = {Tip for surviving major life crises},
    journaltitle = {The Grey Literature},
    author = {Benjamin Gregory Carlisle},
    address = {Montreal, Canada},
    date = 2009-11-27,
    url = {https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/27/tip-for-surviving-major-life-crises/}
}

MLA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. "Tip for surviving major life crises" Web blog post. The Grey Literature. 27 Nov 2009. Web. 16 Dec 2018. <https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/27/tip-for-surviving-major-life-crises/>

APA

Carlisle, Benjamin Gregory. (2009, Nov 27). Tip for surviving major life crises [Web log post]. Retrieved from https://www.bgcarlisle.com/blog/2009/11/27/tip-for-surviving-major-life-crises/

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